CALIFORNIA DREAMING

California Dreaming: Tom and Tracy’s California Journal

DSC07761From The Maitai Vault

What’s great here in the Golden State? There are some stops in California that demand extra time and energy to explore.  Others require just a quick stop.  That’s what we’re here to do.  From magnificent museums to gorgeous settings to events unique to our great state…and even a fork in the road…this section gives you a unique cross section of California, and the places you should spend some time exploring while visiting.  My most recent posts are at the top as we keep adding places that we travel, and add additional information to spots we revisit more frequently.  Hopefully this will give you some ideas on what to see in our great state.


Griffith Observatory – Los Angeles

Star Trekking Griffith Observatory – Los Angeles Visited: December 2017 If you want to see some real stars when you visit the Hollywood area, forget Hollywood… this place is it!  The Griffith Observatory is one of Southern California’s most famous landmarks, and millions of visitors have gotten spaced out here out since it opened in 1935.  It’s a short drive from Hollywood, and is a fun, yet educational, spot to take in at day or night, especially when a celestial event is taking place. The land where Griffith Observatory sits was once a part of a Spanish settlement known as Rancho Los Felis. The property remained in the Felis family for more than a century and was subdivided through generations … Read more…

Thien Hau Temple – Los Angeles

The Tao of Tom Thien Hau Temple – Los Angeles Visited: November 2017 Entering Chinatown in Los Angeles, Thien Hau Temple beckoned me on a unique journey, where, unbeknownst to me at the time, I would eventually experience the “Tao of Tom.”  Once again, this was a Southern California landmark chosen entirely at random with me not knowing exactly what would transpire.  As so often is the case, it was the “unexpected” that highlighted my visit…or should I say, “visits.”                                               As it turned out, I would make two trips during the same week to find out as much as I could about this colorful Taoist temple operated … Read more…

Church of the Angels – Pasadena

England Comes To Pasadena Church of the Angels – Pasadena Visited: October 2017 It’s not often I mistake Southern California for the English countryside, but a few days ago while driving in the Pasadena, South Pasadena, Highland Park Triangle, for a brief moment I felt like I’d been transported to England.  The beautiful Church of the Angels stands on a small hill on Avenue 64, and it is truly reminiscent of the gorgeous little churches you see dotting the back roads of Great Britain. There’s a reason the church, set on three acres, reminded me of England since its looks are quite similar to Holmbury St Mary’s Church, near Dorking, Surrey, England (below).  Church of the Angels is said to … Read more…

Lincoln Memorial Shrine, Redlands Bowl & A.K. Smiley Public Library – Redlands

California’s Lincoln Memorial…and more! Lincoln Memorial Shrine, Redlands Bowl & A.K. Smiley Public Library – Redlands No score and three days ago, and dedicated to the proposition that all museums are created equal, I donned my stovepipe hat and traveled out to Redlands to check out the only museum west of the Mississippi River devoted to Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War; The Lincoln Memorial Shrine.  Honestly!  While there, I discovered two additional architectural points of interest located within walking distance of the museum that also piqued my curiosity.  My kind of day! First the Lincoln Memorial Shrine.  Why Redlands?  I’m glad you asked, because it’s a rather fascinating story. Robert Watchorn grew up very poor in England, so poor that … Read more…

San Secondo d’Asti Catholic Church – Ontario & Madonna of the Trail – Upland

Accidental Treasures San Secondo d’Asti Catholic Church – Ontario & Madonna of the Trail – Upland Visited: August 2017 It all started innocently enough a few weeks ago while I was researching our 2018 trip to the Piemente region in Italy.  Specifically, I was looking at the town of Asti and one of its main attractions, the 13th century Saint Secondo Catholic Church, which is the oldest church in Asti. However, when I googled that Italian church, the town of Ontario, California, popped up. Of course, this piqued my curiosity. I immediately decided to delve deeper into this mystery that would eventually take me to a story that included the largest vineyard in California, a deadly train accident, a gorgeous … Read more…

Arlington Garden – Pasadena

Pasadena’s Dedicated Public Garden Arlington Garden – Pasadena Last Visited: April 2017 On a beautiful Sunday morning in Pasadena (and aren’t they all), our corgis were feeling a bit restless. Luckily, we live very near to one of Pasadena’s beautiful hidden secrets, Arlington Garden, a three-acre site that also happens to be Pasadena’s only dedicated public garden. With thoughts of birds, bees and butterflies dancing in their heads, we packed the “kids” in the car and we were off on our Sunday morning corgi adventure. In 2005, Arlington Garden founders Betty and Charles McKenney, along with its designer, Mayita Dinos, received inspiration for this garden after reading Jan Smithen’s book Sun-Drenched Gardens: The Mediterranean Style. The garden is located between … Read more…

The Bunny Museum – Altadena

Hoppy Days Are Here Again! The Bunny Museum – Altadena Thanks to their adoration of everything bunny, Candace Frazee and Steve Lubanski have taken hare raising to a new level. What started as a gesture of love by two people exchanging bunny gifts has turned into the largest collection of bunny paraphernalia in the world. The couple recently re-located from their home in Pasadena and reopened The Bunny Museum on North Lake Avenue in Altadena.  The museum houses 34,000+ bunny items.  Yes, you read that number correctly (well, you know how rabbits multiply).                                                                It all started innocently enough when the two were dating. In 1993, Steve gave Candace a large, stuffed white rabbit for Valentine’s Day. I wondered if … Read more…

Greystone Mansion & Gardens – Beverly Hills

Intrigue, Scandal, Ghosts & Deaths In The Mansion Greystone Mansion & Gardens – Beverly Hills Visited:  April 2017 Lights!  Camera!  Murder!  The historic Greystone Mansion & Gardens, nestled above Beverly Hills, which is now primarily used for private events, weddings and filming, has a history that includes scandals, at least six deaths and is even rumored to be haunted.  In addition, it’s also been the venue for dozens of movies and television shows. My kind of place!  (Two photos below are courtesy of the City of Beverly Hills.)                                        Tracy and I visited on April Fools Day and took the Ranger Tour.  Throughout the years, I have … Read more…

Los Angeles Police Museum – Los Angeles (Highland Park)

An Arresting Museum Los Angeles Police Museum – Los Angeles (Highland Park) This is the city…Los Angeles, California. The story you are about to read is true.  None of the names have been changed to protect the innocent (or guilty).  It was Wednesday, March 1…another warm, winter day in the City of the Angels.  I was working the day watch out of unusual museums.  I found one that was open…the Los Angeles Police Museum.  My name is Mai Tai Tom…I carry a camera (“dum-da-dum dum”). Yes, I was a Dragnet fan.  “Just the facts ma’am.” Tracy and I had paid a quick visit to the Los Angeles Police Museum about six years ago (so a couple of photos like the … Read more…

All Saints Episcopal Church – Pasadena

“Pasadena’s Stained Glass Marvel” All Saints Episcopal Church – Pasadena Last Visited: February 2017 For those who have never read anything I’ve written about (you have lots of company), although not a religious person per se, I am very fascinated with places of worship.  It’s been nearly a year since I visited any of our area’s iconic churches.  In the past, I’ve featured an historic Roman Catholic Church in L.A. (St. Vincent de Paul); a gorgeous Greek Orthodox cathedral on the edge of L.A.’s Koreatown (Saint Sophia Cathedral); and Pasadena’s venerable Catholic church, St. Andrew.  Today, it’s another historic Pasadena church, All Saints Episcopal Church, that I will describe (to the best of my ability). To find the origin of … Read more…

Sports Museum of Los Angeles – Los Angeles

“Cooperstown West” Sports Museum of Los Angeles – Los Angeles Visited:  August 2016 (in October 2016, it was announced that the museum will be closed until they find a new location) Although it is not officially dubbed “Cooperstown West,” the Sports Museum of Los Angeles could, in reality, use that title and have no qualms in doing so (well, other than the fact Cooperstown might sue them).  Simply stated, however, this is a tremendous sports museum, and to me was just as memorable…or maybe even more memorable…than my visit to Cooperstown. The Sports Museum of Los Angeles contains a treasure trove of historical sports memorabilia that is truly one-of-a-kind.  According to former Dodgers’ owner Peter O’Malley, “It’s the best sports … Read more…

Pasadena Museum of History/Fenyes Mansion – Pasadena

“Downsized” Mansion Pasadena Museum of History/Fenyes Mansion – Pasadena It’s not often that when a family plans to downsize, they decide to build a 21-room Beaux Arts mansion, but that’s exactly what Dr. Adalbert and Eva Fenyes did back in 1906 (well, a few rooms were added in 1911).  Recently I took a tour of that historic home; Pasadena’s famed Fenyes Mansion.  Not only is the mansion a cool place to visit, but the history of the house (which at one time also served as the Finnish Consulate) and its occupants are equally as interesting.                     After my tour, I also “horsed” around a bit at the nearby Pasadena Museum Of History (who maintains the century-old estate and provides these … Read more…

St. Andrew Church – Pasadena

An Historic Pasadena Church St. Andrew Church – Pasadena Visited:  July 2016 Thanks in part to a lost necklace and a good deed by yours truly (yes, I’m as shocked as you by this random act of kindness), I was able to glean much more information about an historic Pasadena church that I toured a few days ago (more on that “divine intervention” later). The interior and exterior architecture of St. Andrew Catholic Church (which will celebrate its 90th birthday next year) combines two famed Rome churches.  Constructed in 1927 (the parish has been around since 1886), the 140-foot tall, Romanesque campanile of St. Andrew replicates the one found at the 8th-century Basilica di Santa Maria in Cosmedin.                     … Read more…

Walt Disney Family Museum – San Francisco

The Wonderful World of (Walt) Disney Walt Disney Family Museum – San Francisco If Walt Disney wasn’t the most innovative and creative person on the planet in the 20th century, he’s certainly close. So when Kim and Mary told us about the Walt Disney Family Museum at the Presidio in San Francisco (they had visited once before), a museum that chronicles the life, achievements and legacy of this creative genius, we donned our mouse ears and headed out (ok, we didn’t wear mouse ears). Tracy and I had viewed a PBS two-part documentary about Disney the previous month, and learned he was quite a complex man (as most geniuses tend to be). He had his failures to be sure, but … Read more…

Forest Lawn – Glendale

The Great Mausoleum Art Tour…and much, much more Forest Lawn – Glendale Visited:  June 2016 How is it possible to witness some of the world’s greatest art masterpieces located in Rome, Florence and Milan in the span of just a little more than an hour?  Easy…just visit the cemetery.  Well, not any cemetery, but Forest Lawn in Glendale. Tracy and I hopped in the car for the short ride to Forest Lawn and its Great Mausoleum Art Tour on a Sunday morning.  Our one-hour art tour turned into a four-hour trek around Forest Lawn where we would also visit a number of renowned celebrities (dead, of course), a famous statue (or two, or three), a couple of gorgeous churches, and … Read more…

Jack London State Historic Park – Glen Ellen

“The air is wine…I have everything to make me glad I am alive.” Jack London State Historic Park – Glen Ellen Visited:  May 2016 Time for a little Northern California love!  In all the times we have traveled in and around the Sonoma County area, there was one place I had always yearned to visit, but never seemed to have the time (probably too much wine tasting).  Tracy and I (along with friends Kim and Mary) finally heeded the call of the wild to stop in and check out Jack London State Historic Park in Glen Ellen over Memorial Day weekend, and it was well worth our 2 1/2 hours spent in this pristine park. As the website states: The … Read more…

Central Library – Los Angeles

“Light Of Learning!” Central Library – Los Angeles Visited: May 2016 Who knew that a library could be this beautiful, vibrant and interesting?  Well hold on to your Dewey Decimal System, we’re going to take a little tour of one of the most gorgeous buildings in Los Angeles, and you don’t even need a library card to take the tour. I had printed out the online pdf tour of the Richard J. Riordan Central Library in downtown Los Angeles and drove to a nearby (well, sort of) parking lot about five blocks away (hey, it saved me six bucks from the closer lot). From there, I booked it over to the library, tour papers in my hand. As it turned … Read more…

Millennium Biltmore Hotel – Los Angeles

“Luxury Heaped Upon Luxury” Millennium Biltmore Hotel – Los Angeles Visited:  May 2016 Having made reservations a few weeks in advance with the Los Angeles Conservancy, Tracy and I headed to downtown Los Angeles on what turned out to be  a very hot Sunday afternoon to check out their tour of one of the city’s most famous and venerable hotels. Parking nearby, we descended a million stairs (slight exaggeration). and with the Los Angeles Library (a tour I will be doing soon) looming in front of us, we were on our way to the Millennium Biltmore Hotel. Since we were early for our tour, we decided to eat lunch at a very highly-rated French bakery and pâtisserie near the Biltmore … Read more…

Castle Green – Pasadena

Early 20th Century Elegance Castle Green – Pasadena Last Visit – Mother’s Day Tour • May 8, 2016 (the self-guided tour I took is below this original report) When I have friends visit from out of town, one place always grabs their attention as we drive around town. In the early 20th century, Pasadena was home to one of the most luxurious hotels around. It was called The Hotel Green (now called Castle Green). This is from Castle Green’s website: “One of Pasadena’s most unique buildings, the Castle Green was built in 1898 as the annex for the famous Hotel Green. The Castle Green is an imposing seven story Moorish Colonial and Spanish style building sitting next to Central Park … Read more…

Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum – Los Angeles

A Stadium Full Of Cherished Memories Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum – Los Angeles Visited: April 5, 2016 It’s the stadium where I attended my first baseball game back in 1959, my first college and pro football games in the 1960s, plus the venue where I saw my only Olympic Games. So many memories, and now I had the opportunity to take a tour of the stadium where all these great sporting events all took place. Los Angeles County encompasses more than 10 million residents, so I found it quite remarkable that when I took a guided tour of the historic Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, I turned out to be the only person on the tour (perhaps the rest of L.A. … Read more…

Jackie and Mack Robinson Memorial – Pasadena

Hometown Heroes Jackie & Mack Robinson Memorial – Pasadena Last Visited:  April 3, 2016 Located across the street from the Pasadena City Hall is the memorial dedicated to two of the city’s famous sons, brothers Jackie and Mack Robinson. The bronze sculptures were dedicated in 1997 and the memorial was completed in June 2002.  They are located on Garfield Avenue, just north of Union Street and across the street from Pasadena City Hall. There is also a ring of granite tiles etched with donor’s names, benches and landscaping, which includes peach trees. Mack, the older brother of Jackie, won the silver medal in the men’s 200 meters at the 1936 Summer Olympics in Berlin, finishing just 0.4 seconds behind Jesse … Read more…

St. Vincent de Paul Church – Los Angeles

Figueroa Corridor Icon St. Vincent de Paul Church –  Los Angeles Visited: March 24, 2016 Being an equal opportunity historic church seeker, on my late morning sojourn I traveled near downtown Los Angeles to the famed Figueroa Corridor and the beautiful St. Vincent de Paul Church, the second Roman Catholic church in Los Angeles to be consecrated. Frenchman Vincent de Paul was “renowned for his compassion, humility, and generosity and is known as the Great Apostle of Charity.”   He died in 1660 and  was declared Patron Saint of all works of charity by Pope Leo XIII and was canonized June 16, 1737.  There is a Society of St. Vincent de Paul, which was founded by French students in the … Read more…

Nethercutt Museum & Collection – Sylmar

The Coolest Museum You’ve Never Heard Of Nethercutt Museum & Collection – Sylmar Visited:  March 10, 2016 Who knew that because so many women use a certain cosmetic product line that I would be afforded the opportunity to visit one of the coolest museums most people don’t even know exists?  Located in Sylmar, the Nethercuttt Museum houses what it calls “functional fine art.” If you like vintage automobiles and musical instruments that will blow your mind, this is the place.  An even bigger plus…this museum is free! In 1923, 10-year-old J.B. Nethercutt moved to Santa Monica from South Bend, Indiana, to live with his aunt, Merle Nethercutt Norman, who also happened to be the founder of Merle Norman Cosmetics. In … Read more…

Los Angeles Maritime Museum/Port Of Los Angeles Tour – San Pedro

Everything Is Ship Shape Los Angeles Maritime Museum/Port Of Los Angeles Tour – San Pedro March 8, 2016 Thanks to the Chilean Fresh Fruit Association wanting me to write an article for them (you see, I do work occasionally), recently I was afforded the opportunity to mix a little business with a lot of pleasure down at the Port Of Los Angeles in San Pedro. Ostensibly, my job entailed writing a story about Chilean fresh fruit being unloaded at the port, which I parlayed into a nice boat ride and a visit to the nearby Los Angeles Maritime Museum.  As an added bonus, it turned out to be one of the most beautiful days weather-wise I could remember. I arrived … Read more…

USC Pacific Asia Museum – Pasadena

Traveling Through Asia In Pasadena USC Pacific Asia Museum – Pasadena Visited: March 2, 2016 After passing by this building literally hundreds of times during my life, it was finally time to step inside Pasadena’s USC Pacific Asia Museum. Dedicated to “the arts and culture of Asia and the Pacific Islands,” this museum opened in 1971, and is one of those places where the architecture and the history of this building is just as interesting as what is contained inside. Grace Nicholson moved to California from Philadelphia in 1901. She had a profound interest in Native American art and set up a curio shop on Raymond Avenue in Pasadena. By the 1920s, she needed more space, so she hired a … Read more…

Saint Sophia Cathedral – Los Angeles

My Big, Gorgeous Greek Cathedral Saint Sophia Cathedral – Los Angeles Visited: February 23, 2016 When we travel to Europe (or anywhere else for that matter) I’m always intrigued by churches…especially their interiors.  Why?  I haven’t a clue. It doesn’t matter what the denomination, churches fascinate me, even when they’re not serving wine.  Yet at home, I haven’t searched out many interesting places of worship in my immediate area. That all changed yesterday.  While in downtown Los Angeles for business (yes, work happens; even for the semi-retired), I decided to make a slight diversion on the way home to stop by a famous Greek Orthodox cathedral I’d read was located just south of Koreatown (perhaps it was built here to … Read more…

Balboa Park – San Diego

A Century Of History Balboa Park – San Diego Visited – February 8, 2016 Throughout 2015, Tracy and I must have said 50 times that we wanted to visit Balboa Park in San Diego due to the fact that it was celebrating its 100th year. Well, we finally made it…just in time for Birthday Number 101. Although I had been to Balboa Park numerous times during my college days, it was usually just to play football (and maybe consume a cold beer or two) on one of the spacious grassy areas that surround the park.  Now, I wanted to come back and see the museums and the architecture, especially since its Moorish influences were quite reminiscent of our recent trip … Read more…

Grand Central Market – Los Angeles

Ain’t It Grand! Grand Central Market – Los Angeles Visited: February 5, 2016 Los Angeles has so many cool spots to visit, and last week I had some time before a business meeting to check out a venerable old establishment that has undergone a recent transformation from past to present, without losing its sense of history. I believe this ever-changing dynamic will make this always-popular place even more of a destination for locals and visitors alike. One of the great downtown Los Angeles institutions, the Grand Central Market opened 99 years ago in 1917. As the ethnicity and population of Los Angeles has changed, so has the evolution of the Grand Central Market. Back in the 1920s, so says the … Read more…

Storrier Stearns Japanese Garden – Pasadena

Pasadena’s “Secret” Japanese Garden Storrier Stearns Japanese Garden – Pasadena Visited: January 21, 2016 Always on the search for new gardens, I was alerted by a Facebook post about a garden I had never heard of…and it’s located only ten minutes from our house in Pasadena.  Far from being a new garden, the Storrier Stearns Japanese Garden is one of the few remaining pre-war (World War II) private estate gardens, and after years of neglect it was restored about 11 years ago. Back in the early 20th century, there were numerous beautiful, large homes on and near Orange Grove Avenue (sadly, many of these mansions were torn down to make way for dreadful looking apartment and condo projects).  Charles Storrier … Read more…

The Broad – Los Angeles

Thoroughly Modern MaiTai The Broad – Los Angeles Visited: December 1, 2015 My life has been turned upside down. If you read my Spain report (or any of my trip reports for that matter), you know Tracy and I are not aficionados of contemporary art. From the Fundació Joan Miró in Barcelona to the Museo Reina Sofía in Madrid to the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris, we have never been to a contemporary art museum that we have enjoyed. However, that doesn’t mean we aren’t willing to give these places a chance, and when we received the opportunity to visit The Broad (pronounced Brode), the new downtown Los Angeles contemporary art museum that just opened in September (and also the … Read more…

The Huntington Library, Art Collections & Botanical Gardens – San Marino

The Indoor/Outdoor Museum Experience The Huntington Library, Art Collections & Botanical Gardens – San Marino Last visit…November 29, 2015…Three updates below since I first wrote this initial report in 2012 focus on other aspects of the Huntington and a famous stinky flower… There are a lot of things I appreciate more as an adult than I did as a kid. They include naps, Mozart, a good bottle of bourbon and a great museum located virtually in my own backyard. As a youngster, the gorgeous gardens at the Huntington Library were just a pretty cool place to play an extended version of hide and seek from my parents (who I think were happy not to find me at times). As an … Read more…

Bob’s Big Boy – Burbank

Little Big Man Bob’s Big Boy – Burbank Back in 1936, after selling his DeSoto roadster, Bob Wian founded a restaurant chain originally named Bob’s Pantry, but anyone growing up in Southern California knows it as Bob’s Big Boy.  In 1937, supposedly at the request of one of his customers, the Bob’s Big Boy Double-Decker hamburger was born. According to the Bob’s website, “Customers couldn’t get enough of Bob’s new creation. One fan in particular was a chubby six-year-old boy in droopy overalls. He would often help Bob sweep up in exchange for a free burger. In honor of his young friend, Wian decided to name the better burger the Big Boy. Another regular customer, a movie studio animator, sketched … Read more…

Santa Anita Park “Seabiscuit Tour” – Arcadia

Getting To See An “American” Icon Santa Anita Park “Seabiscuit Tour” – Arcadia It’s not often (if ever) you get to see a Triple Crown winner up close (especially since there is only one horse currently alive who has accomplished that feat), but Tracy and I hoped we would get lucky when we called last week and scored tickets to an early morning tour at Santa Anita Park in Arcadia on closing day of the meeting: Sunday, June 28. Although it’s called “The Seabiscuit Tour,” we were betting that another horse would be the star of our day.  Like many of my bets (although not the one below), it would be a longshot at best to see him up close … Read more…

Battleship USS IOWA Museum – San Pedro

“The Battleship Of Presidents” Battleship USS IOWA Museum – San Pedro My dad was a naval officer who served in World War II on Guadalcanal, so the Navy (and especially naval vessels) have always held a special interest for me. Tracy and I toured the USS Midway in San Diego about four years ago (we finally got Tracy and Mary out of the brig), and in the past year we’ve had a couple of opportunities to go aboard one of the greatest battleships that has ever sailed the seas.                                      On a recent Sunday morning (April 19th…the date is important), Tracy and I put on our sea legs and served our second tour of duty aboard one of … Read more…

Descanso Gardens – La Cañada Flintridge

Completing The Southern California Garden Trifecta Descanso Gardens – La Cañada Flintridge A few Sundays ago, in early March, Tracy said it was high time we finished our “Garden Trifecta.”  We’ve spent a lot of time at the The Huntington Library, Art Collections & Botanical Gardens in San Marino and the Los Angeles County Arboretum & Botanic Gardens in Arcadia, however there was still one more nearby floral mecca to check out before we could be considered true local flower power aficionados.  This would finally be the day.                                                       It had been nearly a decade since we had been to Descanso Gardens in La Cañada, and it was just … Read more…

Union Station – Los Angeles

Getting On Track Union Station – Los Angeles Having already been on a couple of Los Angeles Conservancy tours in the past, Tracy and I headed downtown on a Saturday morning to check out an historic Los Angeles landmark that celebrated its 75th birthday in 2014. For this tour, we’d certainly need to keep our train of thought so as to not lose track of what was going on.  That’s right, we were going to visit Union Station, and I will now stop these puns so you don’t start railing against me. We met our guide, who first gave us a little history lesson about Union Station (here’s the CliffsNotes version). The station, now the largest railroad passenger terminal in … Read more…

Korean Bell Of Friendship – San Pedro

A Ringing Endorsement Of Friendship Korean Bell Of Friendship – San Pedro It had been quite some time since I had traveled to San Pedro, but when Tracy and I finally did, we certainly made a day of it.  We visited the USS Iowa, Point Fermin Lighthouse, Fort MacArthur and the Korean Bell Of Friendship.  Let’s start with the latter, and I’ll get to the others in subsequent reports. We drove near the corner of Gaffney and 37th Streets and, after parking in the lot, we started walking toward a large, colorful stone pagoda-like pavilion that holds the bell. The pavilion is in what is called the Korean-American Peace Park, which actually is located inside a space inside Angel’s Gate … Read more…

The Rose Parade – Pasadena

Everything’s Coming Up Roses The Rose Parade – Pasadena When you grow up and live in the Pasadena area for most of your 60 years, there is no way to escape going to the Rose Parade. Believe me, I know! I’m not sure exactly how many Rose Parades I’ve been to in my life, but I am certain the number now exceeds 25. I am not a “parade guy,” but I must admit the Rose Parade “wows” me just about every year I have attended it. I also figure our property values don’t drop as much as the national average since millions of viewers who are hunkered down in snowstorms across the nation witness our New Year’s weather out here … Read more…

The Farmers Market – Los Angeles

Keeping It Fresh The Farmers Market – Los Angeles It was always a special Sunday morning as a kid when my parents would say, “Let’s go to the Farmers Market.” We would hop in the car and take the 40-minute drive to Third and Fairfax in Los Angeles, where an array of walkways with little shops selling everything from fresh fruits and vegetables to touristy trinkets awaited us. My first job after finishing college was at an advertising agency that was located two blocks from the Farmers Market. I would eat at one of their restaurants (including the famed, yet overrated Du-Pars…more on them later) two or three times a week back in 1975 and 1976. It had been quite … Read more…

Los Angeles County Arboretum & Botanic Garden – Arcadia

Peacocks, Plants, Ponds & Pops Los Angeles County Arboretum & Botanic Garden – Arcadia Another slice of local heaven is located within 15 minutes of our house, a spot that not only contains beautiful plants and flowers, but, during the summer, becomes an incredible venue that provides music (along with accompanying peafowl) in a magical setting (more on that later). The Los Angeles County Arboretum & Botanic Garden is basically a 127-acre museum located across the street from the Santa Anita Racetrack in Arcadia, a city just east of Pasadena. It’s home to plant collections from all over the world, including many rare and endangered species, while also serving as an animal sanctuary, including a bunch of loud and beautiful … Read more…

Comfort Women Statue – Glendale

Controversial Statue Comfort Women Statue – Glendale During World War II, it is estimated that up to 200,000 Asian women and girls were forced to be sex slaves by the Japanese Imperial Army, although Japan disputes that fact.  In July 2013, the city of Glendale unveiled a statue of a a young Korean girl seated next to an empty chair.  It happens to be an exact replica of the “peace monument” in front of the Japanese Embassy in Seoul, South Korea.           The bronze statue weighs in at 1,100 pounds and is located in Glendale’s Central Park. It was dedicated despite last minute attempts by opponents, who were mostly from Japan. One of the reasons it … Read more…

Norton Simon Museum – Pasadena

A Day At The Museum Norton Simon Museum – Pasadena Expecting another blistering hot Pasadena afternoon, Tracy and I made up our mind early to hit a museum located in our own home town.  It had been a couple of years since our last visit to the Norton Simon Museum, and since we had never tried their audio guide, we felt this could be a great way to beat the heat and acquire a bit more knowledge about our home grown tourist attraction.  Formerly known as the Pasadena Art Institute (founded in 1922) and then the Pasadena Art Museum (1954), in the 1970s the museum reached out to industrialist Norton Simon, who had become one of the largest art collectors … Read more…

Pasadena Playhouse – Pasadena

The Curtain Rises Pasadena Playhouse – Pasadena On a small street off Pasadena’s famed Colorado Blvd. you will find the Official State Theater of California, the Pasadena Playhouse. I have been lucky enough to see a plethora of plays there since I was a little boy growing up in the region. From Sister Act to Plaid Tidings to a great night featuring Harry Chapin’s music, I have loved going to this theater built in 1925. It was designed in a Spanish Colonial Revival style by Pasadena artist and architect Elmer Grey. In 1917 an itinerant acting troupe by the name of the Gilmor Brown Players settled in Pasadena, which at the time a sleepy little town of farmers and wealthy … Read more…

The Rose Bowl Game & Tour – Pasadena

“The Granddaddy Of Them All!” The Rose Bowl Game & Tour – Pasadena Since I have attended 30 Rose Bowl games in my 60+ years (including the 2014 Stanford-Wisconsin contest…the 100th), it only made sense that on the first day in its 91-year history that the famed Rose Bowl held guided tours, I would be on it. But before I get into the tour (a must for any college football fan), I’ll tell you a little bit about attending the actual game, which has become a football tradition in my lifetime. Rose Bowl Game: Although the 100th Rose Bowl game took place in 2014, the actual Rose Bowl stadium in Pasadena has only been around since 1922.  The Rose Bowl … Read more…

The Gamble House – Pasadena

Going Greene (and Greene) The Gamble House – Pasadena Located abut a mile north of the Wrigley Mansion, just off of Orange Grove Avenue’s former Millionaire’s Row, is the crown jewel of homes designed by famed architect brothers Charles and Henry Greene. The home was commissioned by David and Mary Gamble of Cincinnati in 1908, which is why today it is known as The Gamble House. David Berry Gamble was a second generation member of the Procter & Gamble Company in Cincinnati. He retired from active work in 1895 spent his winters in Pasadena with his wife Mary. In 1907 they decided to build a permanent home in Pasadena. In June of that year, they bought a lot on Westmoreland … Read more…

Ronald Reagan Presidential Library – Simi Valley

Visit One For The Gipper Ronald Reagan Presidential Library – Simi Valley Located about 40 miles northwest of Los Angeles is the “other” presidential library in Southern California. Having visited The Nixon Library in July, Tracy and I (along with friends Lenny and Susan) decided to drive out to Simi Valley on Labor Day to tour the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library. Of the 13 presidential libraries, the Reagan Library is the largest (space-wise, anyway). As is par for the course for Simi Valley in September is the fact it was going to be a hot day, so we had plucked the first reservation time (10:00 a.m.) by phone a few days earlier. Parking near the library in the lot (if … Read more…

Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels – Los Angeles

Controversial Cathedral & Gregory Peck Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels – Los Angeles I must confess (pun intended) that I can see why there was some controversy when it came to the construction of the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels that serves as the Mothership for the Archdiocese of Los Angeles.                                    From 1876 until 1994 the Cathedral of Saint Vibiana (seen below in an old photo) had that distinction, but it was severely damaged in the 1994 Northridge earthquake. There was considerable controversy about rebuilding Saint Vibiana, and in 1996 it was decided to build at another site. The Cathedral of Saint Vibiana was sold to to a developer in 1999, who transformed it into … Read more…

Hollywood Forever Cemetery – Hollywood

Six Feet Under Hollywood Forever Cemetery – Hollywood There’s been one place that I have been “dying” to visit for a very long time, and recently Tracy and I finally made the short drive to Hollywood to visit a number of famous people. Unfortunately, for them, they’re all deceased, however they live on in eternity thanks to the Hollywood Forever Cemetery and its very informative walking tour that dishes out inside stories about a veritable Who’s Who of Dead People. Hollywood Forever Cemetery (originally named Hollywood Memorial Park Cemetery) was built on 100 acres of land in 1899, making it one of the oldest cemeteries in the area. We were told by our tour guide that in the late 1930s, … Read more…

Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum – Yorba Linda

“I’m Not A Crook!” Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum – Yorba Linda Tracy and I are fortunate enough to have two presidential libraries (Richard Nixon and Ronald Reagan) within a relatively short distance of our house. The Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum is located in Yorba Linda (Orange County), the birthplace of the 37th president.  I was in college when Nixon was president, and I honestly detested him. Over the years, I have softened my view a bit, as he was a very complex man.   I thought it would be interesting to see his presidential museum (also his birthplace and the final resting place for both Nixon and his wife Pat), which presents his triumphs, defeats and … Read more…

Flight Path Learning Center & Museum – Los Angeles

Up, Up And Away! Flight Path Learning Center & Museum – Los Angeles Looking for something fun, informative and free (yes, FREE) to do in Los Angeles? Then I’ve got your ticket! Stop by the Flight Path Learning Center & Museum located adjacent to Los Angeles International Airport where you can learn a little airplane history while having a blast reliving your traveling past. Our friends Helen and Joanne (a professed “airplane junkie”), who told us about this place, joined us on a beautiful Saturday morning in November. From the museum’s website, “In November 2002 the Los Angeles Board of Airport Commissioners officially authorized Flight Path to operate an educational facility and museum in the LAX Imperial Terminal. During the … Read more…

Los Angeles City Hall – Los Angeles

Don’t Fight City Hall…Visit It! Los Angeles City Hall – Los Angeles If there’s one building in the City Of Angels that stands out from all the others, it is definitely Los Angeles City Hall. From the old Superman (Daily Planet building) and Dragnet (“This is the city…Los Angeles, California…”) television shows of the 1950s and 1960s to numerous other film endeavors, Los Angeles City Hall has often been the backdrop that has been used by film makers to help this building become one of the most recognizable in the United States. Ground was broken March 4, 1926, on the project.  George Cryer was the mayor at that time, making him, I guess, the “town Cryer.” During Cryer’s administration, large … Read more…

Walt Disney Concert Hall – Los Angeles

Not A Mickey Mouse Concert Venue Walt Disney Concert Hall – Los Angeles Tracy and I had recently been to a Walt Disney Hall concert featuring Mozart and Brahms (well, it was their music…it would be quite an event if Mozart and Brahms really showed up), so when we were downtown recently, we just planned to walk around a bit to take in its unique architecture. Since I was attempting to lose weight (which is most of the time), I ran (ok, walked quickly) up the numerous stairs to where the garden is located. I saw people with headphones on, so after (slowly) coming back down, I said to Tracy, “Let’s see how much the audio tour costs.” Once inside … Read more…

Grand Park – Los Angeles

Grand New Park With Grand Old Flags Grand Park – Los Angeles I often hear people ignorantly spout off and grouse, “There’s nothing to do in downtown Los Angeles on the weekend.” When I hear that, I reply, “Look around, there’s plenty to see and do if you do your homework.” From the Walt Disney Concert Hall to the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels to the famed Biltmore Hotel and much, much more, there are plenty of things that will more than occupy your time during a day in Los Angeles.  Each year, I find more and more interesting things to do in the city. One relatively new addition to the L.A. landscape is Grand Park: The Park … Read more…

Echo Park Lake (Echo Park) – Los Angeles

A $45 Million Walk Around “Lotus Lake” Echo Park Lake (Echo Park) –  Los Angeles So what does $45 million get you these days?  Well, if the two-year renovation of Echo Park Lake is any indication, that heavy chunk of change gets you a beautiful place to spend a lazy Sunday (or any day of the week for that matter) morning.                                 In 2013 (a later update follows), Tracy and I headed out on a very warm Sunday morning to this historic park, famed for its lake’s beautiful beds of lotus flowers, which had just opened the previous day after an extensive facelift. The lake was originally built in the 1860s as a reservoir for drinking water and became an … Read more…

Space Shuttle Endeavour/California Science Center – Los Angeles

Spaced Out In Los Angeles Space Shuttle Endeavour/California Science Center – Los Angeles Everyone gets spaced out living in Los Angeles, so what better way to spend Memorial Day 2013 than head down to the California Science Center to check out the Space Shuttle Endeavour.  I’ve been interested in space travel ever since the Mercury astronaut days, so I was excited to be able to see the shuttle up close, not knowing I’d even get a little Mercury fix at the end. We had purchased our timed tickets on line, and I chose for us to go as early as possible (10 a.m.). The tickets are free, but you have to pay a $2 “convenience” charge to print them out … Read more…

La Brea Tar Pits & Page Museum – Los Angeles

Sticky Situation La Brea Tar Pits & Page Museum – Los Angeles I am a native Angeleno, yet at age 59 years and 362 days, I had never visited the La Brea Tar Pits….a fact that stuck with me…until today, that is.  Even worse, I had never even heard about the museum that was attached to this famed spot.  It’s always the places in your own backyard that you never think about, especially when the backyard is full of tar. Tracy and I drove to the Hancock Park area of Los Angeles (after a visit to the Farmers Market) to see what I had missed all these years. As I was to find out, more than 11,000 years ago the … Read more…

Angels Flight – Los Angeles

The 298-Foot Railway Angels Flight – Los Angeles As Tracy and I rediscovered one Sunday morning, Los Angeles does have some history after all. In 1901, in an effort to connect the downtown Los Angeles shopping district below with the posh residential district of Bunker Hill, replete with Victorian frame houses above (see historical photos), the Los Angeles Incline Railway was born. Known as “The World’s Shortest Railway,” its two counterbalanced passenger cars (dubbed Sinai and Olivet), took L.A. residents up and down the hill (originally 350 feet), running northwest from the west corner of Third and Hill Street, for one penny.  In 1915, they raised the fare to a nickel. The archway on Hill Street that greeted passengers read … Read more…

Dearly Departed: The Tragical History Tour – Hollywood

I See Dead People Dearly Departed: The Tragical History Tour – Hollywood Feeling a little ghoulish about the entire idea, Tracy and I parked our car and walked over to the Hollywood headquarters of Dearly Departed Tours on a hot summer afternoon. This is something we had really looked forward to ever since our friends told us about this unique opportunity. Soon we would meet friends Kelly and Jeffrey at the Dearly Departed Tours office, and then head out on a three-hour tour (sans Gilligan) to see the locations where some notable crimes and deaths had occurred in the Hollywood area over the years. The name of the tour we were about to take was (and still is) called (very … Read more…

The Hollywood Bowl – Hollywood

Music Under The Stars The Hollywood Bowl – Hollywood For the better part of the last 40 years, there has been one place in Southern California that draws me back at least once every summer, and it has nothing to do with the beach. The famed Hollywood Bowl is a venue that every Southern California visitor should experience at least once if you get the chance.  From classical to jazz to rock n’ roll, The Hollywood Bowl is THE place to go for a concert under the stars.                               Usually we get there long before the concert for a picnic.                                                There’s a park across the street where you can bring your spread. Whether it’s … Read more…

Wrigley Mansion – Pasadena

Something To Chew On Wrigley Mansion – Pasadena It’s always nice to see how the other half (or maybe 1%) lives. A good place to check that out is South Orange Grove Blvd. in Pasadena, or what used to be called Millionaire’s Row. That nickname arose from a trend that began in the 1890s, when prominent industrialists (aka rich people) from the Midwest and East Coast started constructing winter homes along South Orange Grove Blvd. After the Great Depression, the mansions of Millionaire’s Row were largely abandoned and many fell into disrepair.  Sadly, in the mid-1940s, the city of Pasadena created a special residential zone that would allow for multiple-unit dwellings of a least 1,400 square feet. Only a few … Read more…

Point Reyes Lighthouse – Point Reyes Station

Light At The Bottom Of The Stairs Point Reyes Lighthouse – Point Reyes Station The odds of a sunny day at Point Reyes Lighthouse along with me climbing up and down 616 stairs without having to use a defibrillator are just about nil. Yet, on the 4th of July, those two amazing events actually occurred, and I lived to tell about it. Our friend, Kim, kept telling me that, although it was a warm and sunny day on the Sonoma Coast, it would probably be foggy at the lighthouse (like this photo above that I took off some website), so be sure to pack some extra layers of clothing. That’s because, according to the National Park Service website, “Point Reyes … Read more…

Spirit of American Youth Rising From The Waves – Glendale

D-Day Commemorated At A Mall Spirit Of Youth Rising From The Waves – Glendale  If you have ever visited the American Cemetery in Normandy (as we did last autumn), you probably saw the sculpture named Spirit of American Youth. It represents the nearly 10,000 soldiers who gave their lives and are buried at the cemetery. The entire experience is quite moving. That’s why it was a little weird to see a replica of that statue in the middle of a mall in Glendale, but there it stands. The Spirit of American Youth Rising From The Waves is the brainchild of Rick Caruso, the man behind the humongous Americana at Brand Mall in Glendale.         As you listen … Read more…

Academy of Television Arts & Sciences Hall of Fame Plaza – North Hollywood

Seeing Stars In North Hollywood Academy Of Television Arts & Sciences Hall Of Fame Plaza – North Hollywood Sure, I’ve lived in Southern California for 60 years, but doesn’t mean I’ve seen everything (or even heard of everything).   A few of these places are only a few miles from where I work.  Such was the case with the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences Hall of Fame Plaza (until today) located in an almost secretive place off Lankershim Boulevard (near the corner of Magnolia) in North Hollywood. The Academy of Television Arts & Sciences Hall of Fame Plaza features bronze sculptures, bas-reliefs and wall sculptures depicting television pioneers who have been inducted into the Hall of Fame. The plaza … Read more…

Capitol Records Building – Hollywood

“The House That Nat Built” Capitol Records Building – Hollywood This is one of the first cool, California buildings that stood out to me as a youngster. The 13-story high Capitol Records Building was constructed and completed in 1956 and was the world’s first circular office building. It was nicknamed “The House That Nat Built” because Nat King Cole brought a lot of success (and money) to the label. A large mural by artist Richard Wyatt, which is titled “Hollywood Jazz,” sits in front of the building. It features large portraits of Nat King Cole, Billie Holiday and many other jazz musicians. For years, this great mural fell into disrepair (I took the below photo in the spring of 2013). Thankfully, … Read more…

World’s Biggest Dinosaurs – Cabazon

Jurassic Park…Just Off The Highway World’s Biggest Dinosaurs If you have ever driven from Los Angeles to the Palm Springs/Indio area in the lower desert, you might have noticed some prehistoric characters (and they’re not the Rolling Stones) lurking just to the north of Interstate 10 in Cabazon. These are the brainchild of a Knotts Berry Farm sculptor and portrait artist, Claude Bell.  He built these to attract customers to his Wheel Inn Cafe, which opened in 1958. Dinny, the first of the Cabazon dinosaurs, was started in 1964 and created over a span of 11 years.  He created Dinny out of spare material salvaged from the construction of nearby Interstate 10 at a cost of $300,000. There is actually … Read more…

J. Paul Getty Museum – Los Angeles

“I Didn’t Steal The Rembrandt” J. Paul Getty Museum – Los Angeles It was just a throwaway comment when I uttered the sentence, but it seemed like a good idea at the time. Then again, this is me (think “Tom, you idiot”).  Late in our day at the Getty Center in Los Angeles on Sunday, after viewing dozens of objets d’art, I said to one of the stern, unsmiling people who ensure little children don’t wipe their boogers on paintings worth more than a million dollars, “It’s hard for me to believe that people can actually walk into these art museums and walk out with, let’s say, a Rembrandt under their arm and not get caught.”Little did I know (actually … Read more…

California Academy of Sciences – San Francisco

Air. Sea. Space. California Academy of Sciences – San Francisco This was going to be the day that Mary, Kim, Tracy and I were to venture from Bodega Bay into “The City” (also known as San Francisco) to see the Birth of Impressionism: Masterpieces From the Musée D’Orsay at the M.H. de Young Memorial Museum in Golden Gate Park. Mary had already purchased the vouchers and everything was set…except for one minor detail: the de Young Museum is closed on Mondays. It was on to Plan B.               It was another nice day as we drove down to San Francisco, but as soon as we neared the Golden Gate Bridge, the famed Bay Area … Read more…

Fort Ross and The Sonoma Coast

“I Can See Russia From My Car” Fort Ross and The Sonoma Coast Starting in the 1740s, frontiersmen from Russia left the Siberian wilderness to look for fur-bearing marine mammals to the east. They first formed a colony in Kodiak, which today is Alaska. The organization was known as the Russian-American Company, and in 1799 Tzar Paul said, “You now have a monopoly over all enterprises in North America.”        In 1809 the company’s manager, Ivan Kuskov, sailed to Bodega Bay. For six months he and 40 Russians plus 150 Alaskans caught more than 2,000 sea otters and brought their pelts to Alaska. He returned, and in 1812 he returned to the area and started the settlement known as Fort … Read more…

Sonoma Square & Surroundings – Sonoma

Hip To Be Square Sonoma Square & Surroundings – Sonoma Always a nice stop for an hour or two when in the area, the Sonoma Square (or Plaza) is an eight-acre National Historic Monument.  It was designed 170 years ago by the Mexican Governor at the time, Mariano Vallejo.               The park has beautiful trees and pedestrian paths. It’s a great place to picnic or just spend some leisurely time doing absolutely nothing.  At its center is the Sonoma City Hall. I t was dedicated in 1908, and is in the center of the plaza. Originally, it was designed with four identical facades so that merchants from any side of the square could say … Read more…

Pasadena’s Historic Homes – Pasadena

This Old House Pasadena’s Historic Homes – Pasadena Besides the famed Greene and Greene Gamble House (which is described in another entry and shown below), Pasadena is blessed with a plethora of unique and historical homes, designed by some of the most famous architects of the era. The Greene Brothers (Charles and Henry) were well known architects of the Arts and Crafts Era. They are famous for the Ultimate Bungalows (finely crafted homes built around the turn of the century).  Most of them were built in Pasadena. Charles Greene House 680 Arroyo Terrace, Pasadena When Charles and his wife, Alice, visited Great Britain while on their honeymoon, he became interested in creating new homes that incorporated the British Arts and … Read more…

Suicide Bridge & Lower Arroyo Seco Trail – Pasadena

A Bridge That Spans The Decades Colorado Street Bridge & The Lower Arroyo Seco Trail – Pasadena Sunday mornings mean “Adventure Time” for our two Corgis, and one spot we all like to go is the nearby Lower Arroyo Seco Trail, where there are numerous good vantage points to get a glimpse of Pasadena history, the Colorado Street Bridge (aka Suicide Bridge). Arroyo Seco literally means dry creek, and the Lower Arroyo Seco Trail stretches from the area immediately south of the Colorado Street Bridge to the border of South Pasadena, and encompasses about 150 acres. On any given Sunday there are plenty of joggers and people out walking their dogs. It’s here where you can catch all those views … Read more…

The Fork In The Road – Pasadena

Fork It Over! The Fork In The Road – Pasadena What do you do when you come to a fork in the road? Get out of the car and take a photo, that’s what. A weird moment occurred a couple of years ago as I drove on Pasadena Avenue north toward St. John Avenue in Pasadena. As I approached the intersection, there was a giant utensil staring me in the face. Of course, I got out to see if my eyes had deceived me. They hadn’t. There was an 18-foot tall fork tall fork towering over me. As it turned out, out, the fork was a very neat birthday prank in honor of Bob Stane, founder of the Ice House … Read more…

Portal Of The Folded Wings – Burbank

Flying High Portal Of The Folded Wing – North Hollywood I’m guessing that any of you who have flown in and out of Bob Hope Airport in Burbank have never traveled the short distance to see The Portal Of The Folded Wings in Valhalla Memorial Park. I hadn’t either until recently. Once the grand entrance to this park, The Portal Of The Folded Wings was constructed six years before the airport. It was dedicated as a Shrine to Aviation on December 17, 1953, which was the 50th anniversary of powered flight. Aviation enthusiasts wanted there to be a final resting place for pilots, mechanics and other pioneers of flight. The Portal Of The Folded Wings is listed on the National … Read more…

Starfighter – George Izay Park – Burbank

“Da Plane!  Da Plane!” Starfighter – George Izay Park – Burbank After driving by this airplane in George Izay Park on Olive Avenue for years on my way to work, I decided I should try and at least find something out about its origin. As it turned out, historical details are somewhat sketchy. The Lockheed Corporation started in California in the early 1900s and was relocated to Burbank in 1934. In 1984, Burbank Mayor Daniel Remy wanted to honor one of the city’s long time employers, so he paved the way for a Lockheed F-104D-15-LO Starfighter jet monument to be placed at George Izay Park. Burbank city officials have often been angry at the cost it takes to maintain the … Read more…

Caltech Olive Walk – Pasadena

Frankie and Remi’s Excellent Adventure Caltech Olive Walk – Pasadena Although not smart enough to ever attend the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) as a student, I (and anyone else) can visit Pasadena’s prestigious university. One way to enjoy the campus is to take the Olive Walk. It is called the Olive Walk because there are about 130 olive trees that are planted on the grounds. Our two corgis, Frankie and Remi, are always up for an adventure, so on this very warm Saturday morning, the four of us piled in the car for the short drive to Caltech. We parked nearby Caltech and strolled down a few blocks until we reached the Anthenaeum, which was constructed in 1930. They … Read more…

USS Midway Museum, San Diego

A Walk Through American Naval History USS Midway Museum, San Diego The USS Midway Museum has always been on our short list of places to go, so Tracy and I drove down the coast to see this piece of American history. We were joined by our friends (and partners-in-crime travel partners) Kim and Mary, their son Sean, Sean’s fiancé (now wife) Maddy and nephew Patrick (who served on an aircraft carrier during Operation Iraqi Freedom) to tour what is arguably the most famous ship in United States naval history. Nearly a quarter of a million soldiers served on the Midway during its tour of duty (1945 – 1992), the longest-serving Navy aircraft carrier of the 20th century. It was another … Read more…